Three Benefits of Warming up


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Three Benefits of Warming up

No Limit Fitness Studio | NLFS CrossFit

If you’ve been to any of our classes or trained with our trainers, you know that every single time you step into No Limit Fitness Studio you will complete a warm-up before attacking a workout. It doesn’t matter if you’re lifting, rowing, playing football, or doing a Bootcamp class, you should ALWAYS warm up first. What is the point of warming up though? Why do we do it? Luckily, we have you covered! Below are three quick benefits of warming up!

  1. It Makes You Limber
    Think about how often you’re sitting throughout your average day. Whether you work at a desk, drive a lot, or even have the day off. You tend to sit a lot more than you realize, and this shortens up some muscles (particularly your hip flexors). When these muscles are shortened it causes some imbalance in the way you move, which then leads to an increased risk of injury. Coming in and getting on the bike for a couple minutes, or taking off on a quick run, helps stretch out all those muscles that have been inactive all day and gets them ready to start working again.
  2. It Wakes You Up
    How much warming up wakes you up may depend on what time you train. A warmup at 5am will take longer than one at 4:30pm because there involves a lot of yawns and overall sleepiness to get through first. The zombie-like entrance of members at 5am and 6am vs how they look after warming up is night and day. The early birds may still feel a bit tired after the warm up, but they are definitely more alert and ready to work. Our afternoon and evening crew tend to get through the warm up a little faster as they start off more alert, so we might just see a little sweat accumulation on them!
  3. It Improves Your Performance
    Think about how you feel on a 400m warm-up run vs running in a workout. In the warm-up run, your legs probably ache, some muscles feel a little off, lungs seem to have trouble catching up with the rest of your body, and your heart rate increases rapidly. After you’ve warmed up, the achiness from the legs is gone (at least mostly), the “off” feeling you had disappeared, since you’ve already been breathing hard your lungs have caught up with you, and your heart rate is elevated but doesn’t have the rapid increase this time. This allows for an increase in speed without the “I’m going to die” feeling you get if you try to sprint your warm-up run. The same goes for weight lifting. Imagine walking in to the gym and trying to pick up your one rep max deadlift without doing any lighter work beforehand. Most likely the bar isn’t going to move an inch!